Wild Coast

Bulungula Lodge (paradise on the beach)

in a village, on the beach

Situated on one of the world's most beautiful, unspoilt beaches in the heart of a traditional Xhosa village, the eco-friendly Bulungula Lodge has been described as "spectacular" by the Lonely Planet and "one of the World's ultimate ethical travel experiences" by The Rough Guide. This Fair-trade lodge is co-owned by the local traditional community and loads of cool activities run daily.

Our beautiful Nqileni village

Spend the night in one of the ten traditional thatch huts (doubles, triples and dorms) or in a safari tent (with beds, bedding and electric light) with beautiful views. There is a affordable restaurant with three delicious meals per day and a help-yourself bar. The entire lodge runs on solar power and makes use of a range of innovative, sustainable technologies which protect our environment.

Our friendly local community and shareholders

 

Activities running daily include: * horse-riding: 2 hour horse rides through the village and along the beach * canoeing: up the beautiful Xhora river * Woman Power: spend a day with the local women learning how to harvest and cook local food, make mud bricks, balance water on your head and just having fun. * Herbalist Forest Tour: wander through the ancient forest with the traditional herbalist and learn about weird and wonderful remedies. * Massage * Village Tour: a walking social history tour of our friendly community. * Fishing: learn how to fish in the sea with a local fisherman. All the above tours are owned and run by members of our local community - so all your money goes where it is most needed. We hope to see you here in paradise.

To make a booking: * Call +27 47 577 8900 (047 577 8900 for South Africans) * or call +27 83 391 5525 (083 391 5525 for South Africans) * Email: paradise@bulungula.com * Visit our website: www.bulungula.com

canoeing the Bulungula river

ROBBIE RESCUE RUNS ROUGH Story: Roger Makings

  • Posted on: 24 October 2013
  • By: JB

http://www.airnews.co.za/News/october2103-robbie-rescue.html

JOHN RUDLING knew he was in trouble when the engine of his Robinson R22 helicopter spluttered and lost power just five feet into the hover – not because he was making an unscheduled touchdown, but rather because of where he was.

 

The aircraft is operated by G4 Helicopters, at Margate Airport, and, since the loss of the company’s R44 earlier this year, it was the only means of keeping the students busy. There was another problem. The R22 was on a verge near a very deserted beach on the rugged Transkei coast – not famous for its roads or communications.

robbie

Some idea of the work and materials which were required to get the damaged R22 from its crash site on to the back of the truck for transportation to the nearest road.

After a cursory inspection, Rudling realised that the aircraft was not going anywhere in a hurry. The engine had blown a valve. “I called the chairman of the Margate Light Plane Club, Des Potts, to see if he could organise some technical assistance. It would soon be getting dark and a night in the bush seemed inevitable,’’ he told me.

Members of the club rallied and soon pilots Dean Riley, Gordon Gray and Sachin Meda, and their aircraft, were thrown into the rescue effort. Supplies, materials and club members were flown in to assist.

robbie

The loading completed, the journey begins.

A plan was made to airlift the R22 off the beach and place it on a nearby road where it could be trucked back to Margate. Quoted costs soon put paid to that option. “But even so, we were still never going to get that aircraft out of there,’’ said Rudling, a part owner and flying instructor at G4 . That was until Mntafufu farmer, Gordon Date, happened along.

Suddenly things started to happen. A truck appeared, a local headman provided overnight security for the helicopter, labourers were made available and food and accommodation appeared from nowhere. A trailer was borrowed from local farmer, Revell Saint. “But we needed a plan. We were about 14 km from where Revell’s trailer was parked. We had nothing more than a Land Cruiser truck, some scaffolding planks and harnesses.

robbie

Everyone holds their breath as the truck begins a climb towards the forrest.

“The salvage was coming together. We could possibly drive the chopper out, but only if we removed the blades and the tail boom,” said Rudling Again Farmer Date came to the party. He had a small boat which could carry the boom and blades on the river to a point close to the road.

Club members got to work stripping the aircraft of its long and dangly bits and built a makeshift ramp on the truck. Eventually with the help of countless farm labourers, the chopper was hoisted on to the back of the truck and secured.

“’Now came the really difficult part. We had nothing more than a bad excuse for a road, sometimes reduced to a pathway, to take us over the hills and through a forest. We were going to have to hack our way out. But,” added Rudling, “there was no way in hell that I was going to drive the truck.” Irrepressible Gordon Date again stepped up to the mark. It was his truck and his farm. He would do it.

robbie

Hacking their way through the bush, the team inches the truck forward.

‘’I more than once thought the chopper was going to fall off the truck. I also, more than once, thought the truck was going to roll over, but they never did.’’ The group of men trudged along next to the truck, lifting branches out of the way or cutting them down as Gordon manoeuvred the unwieldy load through the thick vegetation and over the rough track, with the vehicle often leaning at a precarious angle.

It took more than three hours for the expedition to travel the 14 km to the main road where the aircraft was transferred to the trailer and driven back to Margate.

“Never in my life have I encountered so many people so willing to give selflessly of their time and expertise and not expect anything in return. Gordon did not work on his farm for five days to help us. Revell bent over backwards to lend us equipment and three of our pilots gave up their time and fuel to bail us out. Not to mention the ordinary members who dropped what they were doing and flew out to help us retrieve the chopper. I am truly blessed.’’

 

 

 

robbie

 

Success. All that remains to be done is to transfer the helicopter on to a road trailer and take it to Margate.

DA calls on minister to allocate fishing rights to small-scale fishers

  • Posted on: 24 October 2013
  • By: JB

http://www.bdlive.co.za/business/agriculture/2013/10/24/da-calls-on-minister-to-allocate-fishing-rights-to-small-scale-fishers

(Subsistence fishers obliged to work in cooperatives? (Yah, that'll work. Gugu has the entire co-management commitee structure mapped out for Coffee Bay, and tried for years to get the department to 'cooperate'.)

WHILE the Democratic Alliance (DA) has called on Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Minister Tina Joemat-Pettersson to "urgently" allocate fishing rights in the small-scale fisheries sector, the minister has said she cannot until new legislation was passed.

Ms Joemat-Pettersson has been repeatedly criticised for mishandling her portfolio, which has impact on a large slice of South Africa’s economy. The sectors she controls can provide jobs for unskilled labour in a country embroiled in an education crisis.

Ms Joemat-Pettersson’s small-scale fisheries policy was adopted by Cabinet in 2012, and the process to amend the Marine Living Resources Act began immediately thereafter "to ensure a legal framework exists to enable the implementation of the policy", Ms Joemat-Pettersson’s spokeswoman Carol Moses said on Wednesday.

Earlier this month the minister complained that her department was "operating in a legislative vacuum" because "over 20" pieces of legislation (including the Marine Living Resources Act) that needed amendment were being held up by inaction from Parliament’s agriculture, forestry and fisheries committee.

Moloto Motapo, spokesman for African National Congress (ANC) chief whip Stone Sizani, said on Wednesday there were more than 70 bills before Parliament, all expected before the 2014 elections, and "the reality is that it is impractical that all of them will be passed."

DA agriculture, forestry and fisheries shadow minister Pieter van Dalen said: "The DA urges all stakeholders … to step aside all political machinations and put fishing communities first by processing and passing this vital piece of legislation without delay."

Among others, the bill was set to change the status of South Africa’s roughly 6,000 "subsistence fishermen", designating them "small-scale fishers" and obliging them to work together in co-operatives, Mr van Dalen said.

"This has serious implications considering the significant numbers of subsistence quota holders, their isolated locale, inaccessibility to fishery control offices and the lack of any legal and socioeconomic research or analysis into what it would mean to migrate these quota holders to the category of "small-scale".

It is not feasible to simply remove the largest single recognised category of fishermen from the statue books without a concrete plan to assist them going forward," he said.

Fisheries expert Shaheen Moolla said the problem with the department’s small-scale fisheries policy was that it "lumped everything into one system, one set of rules", when there were several species covered by the policy, not all of which could be fished by small-scale fishers.

Institute for Poverty, Land and Agrarian Studies fisheries expert Moenieba Isaacs, who helped write the new policy, said the policy’s proof would be in its implementation.

Prof Isaacs said the policy was expressly aimed at ensuring those previously excluded from participating in the fishing industry were included. Doing this would require extensive investment in infrastructure in small fishing communities or the policy would not work, she said.

"I do have a problem with the notion of co-operatives, I don’t feel the communities are ready to work as co-operatives yet," she said.

 

 

OCEAN VALLEY VIEW

Sleeps 8 people

Situated in a quiet cul-de-sac in Morgan's Bay, Ocean Valley View offers you comfortable self catering accommodation, with beautiful views of the sea, valley/bush and cliffs all within very easy walking distance of the sea.

This modern architected 3 bedroom double storey house has a spacious open plan setting downstairs leading to a large wooden deck terrace. The three double bedrooms all have their own balcony from which you can relax and enjoy the scenery.

The main bedroom (king size bed) is en-suite equipped with a large oval bath. The second bedroom has a queen size bed and the third bedroom 4 single beds. These two bedrooms share a separate bathroom with shower. There is a downstairs guest toilet and the kitchen is well equipped with a stove, microwave, dishwasher, fridge/freezer and washing machine. There is an outside concrete braai/barbeque.

All bedding is supplied. Guests are required to bring their own towels. Satellite TV reception is available, but you should bring your own DStv Decoder and Smart Card.

Peas on Earth, SA

Peas on Earth offers guests the opportunity to absorb life on a tranquil farm on the picturesque Wild Coast. Our accommodation is situated on Mpetukop Farm, approximately 20km from Komga, Kei Mouth, Morgan Bay and Haga Haga, meaning our guests can enjoy all the coastal highlights from one location. Our 6ha small-holding is a working farm, producing fresh, naturally grown herbs, fruit and vegetables for the local market. We also keep pigs, horses, chickens, bantams and ducks. Guests wishing to explore the farm and learn more about its inner workings are welcome to do so. For those that would prefer to simply sit back and enjoy the atmosphere, we will make sure the farm respects your privacy. Guests at our B&B will have the opportunity to indulge in a breakfast of our home produce, including home-made butter, cheese and preserves; free-range eggs and bacon; and a selection of seasonal crops. Lunch and dinner can also be provided if required, but will be charged at an additional rate.

Fern Cottage, Kei Mouth

Fern Cottage is situated 320 metres from the beach (you can hear the sea when lying in bed at night) and is ideal for couples.

It is a quiet area of Kei Mouth overlooking the golf course with a private braai area looking out into the lush Eastern Cape Bushveld.

Bedroom has a double bed, comfortable lounge area, fully equipped kitchen and a bathroom with a shower. Cottage is cabled for DSTV, bring own decoder and card.

Activities available : Golf, Fishing (shore / river mouth/ River boat / deep sea / rock), Horse Trails, Walking Trails, Mountain Biking, Transkei Trips.

There are a number of restuarants in Kei Mouth, as well as the Country Club.

Contact: Heidi
Email: ferncottage@keimouth.co.za
Cell: 083-444 9499

 

OCEAN VALLEY VIEW

Sleeps 8 people Situated in a quiet cul-de-sac in Morgan's Bay, Ocean Valley View offers you comfortable self catering accommodation, with beautiful views of the sea, valley/bush and cliffs all within very easy walking distance of the sea. This modern architected 3 bedroom double storey house has a spacious open plan setting downstairs leading to a large wooden deck terrace. The three double bedrooms all have their own balcony from which you can relax and enjoy the scenery. The main bedroom (king size bed) is en-suite equipped with a large oval bath. The second bedroom has a queen size bed and the third bedroom 4 single beds. These two bedrooms share a separate bathroom with shower. There is a downstairs guest toilet and the kitchen is well equipped with a stove, microwave, dishwasher, fridge/freezer and washing machine. There is an outside concrete braai/barbeque. All bedding is supplied. Guests are required to bring their own towels. Satellite TV reception is available, but you should bring your own DStv Card. PLEASE NOTE : WE ARE FULLY BOOKED FROM THE 9th OF DECEMBER 2011 TO THE 4th OF JANUARY 2012